GIVE PERCEPTION THE STINK EYE

Patrick Slevin

Which came first reality or perception?

If you answered perception came first, because “perception is reality”, then give yourself a cigar for being duped by a superficial world.

The superficial world wants us to fail. It’s persistently trying to influence how we perceive it with a “what you see, is what you get” construct.  It wants to distract us, with illusions to lull enterprising individuals, organizations and societies into self-induced silos of “ignorance is bliss” apathy and “mind’s eye” atrophy.

The world doesn’t want us to change, but instead to embrace the “devil we know” illusions known as the status quo mindset.

When it comes to changing the world for the better, it’s a matter of you choosing whether to let the world define you or you defining yourself in the world. This is the key.

This explains why over the ages every great idea, cause and invention, was initially rejected and scorned.  How many times have we heard from successful entrepreneurs not to give up? To ignore rejection and to persevere over the naysayers.

We need to give perception the stink eye to develop a new perspective that shifts to a clearer vision of reality that goes beyond face value.  When we achieve a deeper sense of self, we have the power to become agents of change.

But how do we reboot our perspectives that are plugged into a hostile world that wants to keep us down?

Plato gives the ultimate reality check by taking us into a deep, dark cave.

The Greek Philosopher Plato knew how the shadows of the false world were perceived as reality.  These shadows were powerful, imprisoning not only people, but organizations and societies.  Plato wrote in his Allegory of the Cave, humanity was imprisoned in a dark cave, chained in such a way that they could only face forward.  Behind the prisoners, and outside their field of vision, was a blazing fire that would cast the shadows of the sensible world on the cave walls before them.

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These shadows represented perceptions manufactured by the materialistic world, and humanity accepted them as reality. The story goes on to tell a prisoner freeing himself, climbing to the mouth of the cave, to be blinded by the light.

When the enlightened person went back into the cave to share his epiphany, the person was nearly killed for trying to change the perceptions that society believed as reality.

There are countless examples of false shadows misleading humankind such as the world was flat or the world was at the center of the universe.

Science has confirmed Plato’s take on reality that the world isn’t what we have been led to perceive and believe.

Quantum physicists have determined that over 96 percent of matter in the universe is missing. We only experience four percent of the known universe with our senses.

Physicists have also discovered that particles of matter change behavior when someone observes them.  Therefore, mind over matter has merit.

Positive thinking guru Napoleon Hill knew how to change the world nearly 100 years ago with his construct, “What the mind can conceive and believe, it can achieve.”

Reality is what you make of it: It’s relative, it’s intrinsic and it originates at a conscious level.

When it comes to changing the world for the better, it’s a matter of you choosing whether to let the world define you or you defining yourself in the world. This is the key.

The reality that we hold within our minds, not only determines how we perceive the world, but also how we construct the world “out there”.

So adjust your eyes from being receivers of false realities to projectors manifesting and changing a world according to your desired reality of success.

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Patrick Slevin is a nationally recognized persuasion consultant, retained to accomplish one goal – Communicating the Truth. He has changed the minds of millions of people on behalf of corporations, special interests and campaigns.  

Find out how he’s Changing Minds at the Speed of Perception!™  by connecting with him on LinkedIn or go to www.PatrickSlevin.com.

 

The Reality of Death

Grim Reaper Standing in the Meadow

Last weekend, I spent most of my Saturday in a FL hospice with a man that I had only met one time before. He died early the next morning. He died with loved ones comforting him as he struggled to stay alive to the very end.

Death awaits us all. How you face death depends on how you face life. The more you allow yourself to be distracted by the illusions of the world, the harder your death will be. Death strips away the illusions that deceive us from knowing the truth about this world and ourselves in this world.

One of the secrets of life is realizing the truth during our life’s journey. To find the truth, you must have the character in place to handle and discern the realities of what’s wrong and what’s right. More importantly, having the faith and courage to do the right thing every time.

The illusions of the secular world help justify the wrongs, and in many cases redefine the wrongs into warped realities of right. Ex: Burning the American flag. It’s your legal right, but it still doesn’t make it right.

Bald Eagle and Flag

What do you see when you look in the mirror? When death comes calling, you will see your reflection. However, you won’t see the facade of your body, but rather the reflection of your character. Will you be satisfied or will you be struggling? I’ve witnessed many deaths, enough to say you don’t want to be struggling.

Death sucks, but how we die is determined by how we developed our personal relationship with God. Blaming God for the wrongs of this world is a self-imposed illusion. Don’t fall for it. God loves me, you and humankind. He created us in His image and it’s that image that we must strive to reflect in the mirror of life and the mirror of death.

Patrick Slevin is The Reality is Perception Expert™. Mr. Slevin is a special projects consultant working with corporate clients and special interests in altering and affirming the perceptions of stakeholders who impact their bottom line realities. For more information go to www.PatrickSlevin.com.